Forum Posts

wefr1
Jul 05, 2020
In Forum VI - Safe Spaces
"Anybody who comes to speak to you and you disagree with, you should have an argument with ‘em. But you shouldn’t silence them by saying, 'You can’t come because I'm too sensitive to hear what you have to say.' That’s not the way we learn either." -Former United States President Barack Obama Although safe spaces indubitably act as areas of respite for many, are participants (namely younger generations) beginning to rely on them as a means of avoiding ideological conflict altogether? Does a lack of exposure to potentially offensive perspectives result in individuals that are unable to tolerate virtually any perceived criticism or offense?
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wefr1
Mar 07, 2019
In Cases of Depression
One of the most impactful presidents the United States has ever had, Abraham Lincoln left quite the legacy. From leading the country out of civil war to the abolition of slavery, Lincoln is known for many things, yet one aspect of his life is often overlooked: throughout his life, Lincoln suffered from severe clinical depression. Mental illness wasn't a well-recognized topic at the period when Lincoln lived, but, looking back, it becomes clear that he wasn't mentally well. His close companions often described him as "dripping with melancholy," "diffident," and "plagued." In 1841, Lincoln sought the help of a doctor after becoming openly suicidal, describing himself as "the most miserable man living." After spending some time recovering with said doctor, Lincoln used his feeling of duty to his country as motivation. Serving his nation gave him a sense of purpose, and the unending nature of his work led him to live out the rest of his life. While Lincoln continued to struggle with mental issues until his assassination, his dedication to his work allowed him to escape a far more premature death. While we can point out hundreds of modern celebrities who have suffered from/overcome depression, it's another thing entirely to recognize that depression has affected millions of people throughout all of human history. Although it may be increasing, depression has been around for a long time, and countless famous historical figures have felt its burden.
Abraham Lincoln content media
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wefr1
Mar 07, 2019
In Cases of Depression
Throughout his numerous appearances in sporting events or blockbuster films, The Rock is often portrayed as either a macho man or a friendly giant. For that reason, many loyal viewers are surprised to find out that The Rock actually struggled with depression on multiple instances. Johnson saw the effects of depression from a young age, when he saved his mother from her attempted suicide. After being evicted from their apartment, Johnson's mother attempted to walk into oncoming traffic, only to be jerked out of the way by Johnson before a car struck. As for The Rock himself, Johnson originally wanted to pursue a career in (American) football, before suffering numerous injuries which rendered him unable to pursue his passion. Shortly thereafter, his girlfriend left him, sending him into an awful state which he describes as "my absolute worst time." When talking with fans about the path to recovery, The Rock stressed the importance of outreach and awareness, stating: "We’ve always got to do our best to pay attention when other people are in pain. We have to help them through it and remind them they are not alone."
Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson content media
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wefr1
Mar 07, 2019
In Cases of Depression
Many people know Ellen DeGeneres for her bubbly personality and entertaining daytime TV, but fewer know her struggles with depression. After coming out as gay, DeGeneres said she felt alienated in the entertainment industry, and that her career started to spiral downwards. Moving to Los Angeles, her condition worsened. As DeGeneres herself said, "If you ever have experienced depression, you isolate yourself and don’t reach out for help. You don’t say, ‘I’m hurting, I need help’ – you kind of crawl further into that dark hole, so that’s where I was for a while." However, through a combination of meditation, therapy, and antidepressants, DeGeneres was able to combat depression, and began to climb her way to TV stardom. DeGeneres's story is truly inspiring, as it shows how there's hope for other suffering from the same or similar debilitating illnesses: now, we get to see plenty of the Ellen that we all know and love!
Ellen DeGeneres content media
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wefr1
Feb 25, 2019
In Geriatric Depression
In recent years, a central component of the fight for the validation of mental illnesses has been celebrities coming forward with their stories and struggles. However, many of these public figures are younger and idolized by millennials and/or Generation Z -- are there any older celebrities who have brought their own stories of depression into the public light? How have these stories impacted the way we as a society approach the topic of geriatric depression?
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wefr1
Feb 19, 2019
In Geriatric Depression
Obviously, it's awful that such a large percentage of our elderly suffer from depression. However, as cruel as it may be, it's clear to see why there would be a lack of public interest surrounding geriatric depression -- because the elderly (typically) have less time left than their younger counterparts, people may not stress the importance of battling geriatric depression. Furthermore, because many elderly people are retired, some may argue that there's little economic gain to addressing elderly depression, as there would be no lost workplace productivity. Do these arguments follow logically? Are they moral?
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wefr1
Jan 20, 2019
In Adolescent Depression
What resources are available to depressed teenagers? How effective have these resources been? Why do some teenagers hesitate with getting help?
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wefr1
Dec 13, 2018
In Forum I - Vaccines
I think it's pretty clear that society, in general, tends to shun and degrade those that choose not to vaccinate their children (whether for good reason or not is still up for debate). However, isn't this counterproductive? While education is an unequivocal good, wouldn't the way our society treats those that choose not to vaccinate their children only push them away and isolate them further? How does this help anything? Wouldn't it just motivate parents to further ignore public opinion and follow their own reasoning?
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wefr1
Nov 26, 2018
In Forum I - Vaccines
We can debate the morality of the use of vaccines all day, but something that's been widely ignored is the morality of the creation of vaccines. In the U.S., for example, the French pharmaceutical company Sanofi Pasteur manufactures most of the vaccines distributed in the United States, receives a large portion of the $1.61 billion dollars generated in revenue in the U.S. alone -- part of a $4 billion dollar market worldwide. Is it moral for us to allow for-profit organizations to create vaccines which governments distribute to large quantities of the population? If a cure for the flu were developed, why would there be any motive whatsoever for a company like Sanofi Pasteur to release it? Wouldn't it be better for them to continue profiting off the potential illnesses of the world?
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wefr1

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