Forum Comments

What are some must-have safety measures for schools choosing to re-open? Do you think those measures will be appropriately upheld?
In Forum VII - Reopening
Do universities have a moral responsibility as academic institutions to create and maintain safe spaces on their campuses?
In Forum VI - Safe Spaces
Alex Jeon
Jul 07, 2020
Hey! So here are my thoughts on this prompt! I'll be direct. My answer to the question would be not really. This is because many against safe spaces, especially in an academic setting, argue that the formation of safe spaces disrupts the freedom of speech that every individual is born with. Good or bad, everyone's perspective is allowed to be expressed [of course, there are certain exceptions]. The purpose of safe spaces is to allow minority groups to be emotionally secure in a location or in a certain group of people and not have to explain why they wear certain clothing or have certain hairstyles. This allows them to express themselves in a safe setting and this is not what I'm against. What I am against is that safe spaces ironically hinder other majorities/groups from freedom of expression. This is like the cobra effect, when a solution or certain change has the opposite effect of what was intended. By implementing safe spaces, it ironically creates an equal or increased amount of disparities among non-minorities. I rather think that the entire academic institution should strive to be a safe space for everyone than make a safe space for just a certain group, which I admit is more idealistic than pragmatic. So, I believe that universities should keep trying to tackle inequalities to minority groups, but just with a different approach. To contrast, many do say because groups such as LGBTQ have a pretty tragic history of discrimination, the disparity towards majorities is morally sound. However, I disagree. Yes, many people were/are hurt. Yes, many families were/are ripped apart. Yes, it's truly horrific. I personally have seen and dealt with racism throughout my life, but I still firmly endorse the belief of forgiveness rather than revenge. As Martin Luther King Jr states: "If we do an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, we will be a blind and toothless nation." Thanks for listening~
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Why do some countries allow prostitution and some do not?
In Forum V - Prostitution
Alex Jeon
Jun 30, 2020
Hi! I think that in the countries that have legalized prostitution, it's a general census that it is usually safer. Either way, legalizing or not legalizing prostitution, it will continue to occur. The only difference would be that the former not only diminishes the inherent negative stigma behind prostitution, but also it promotes those in the industry to pursue safer methods; but, the latter would be less regulated and more underground, leading to the increased probability of being deemed unsafe. [Think of when some governments began to ban drug-usage, it just increased the public demand for them and fuel the black market] What I mean by "unsafe" is, for instance, the working conditions. The client and the sex worker might be imposed to more dangerous working conditions in places where prostitution is inhibited to hide what they are doing. Moreover, by having the government recognize prostitution, it would gift those in the industry better health services and pensions, while the government could better receive taxation from regulated prostitution as sex workers would be more liable. Thus, it's a mutualistic action for both sides. In contrast, I think the most likely culprit to not legalize prostitution is due to religious values that many people hold. By doing so, these people would morally be against prostitution and think that legalizing it would be unheard of. Another possible reason is feminism, those that value feminism might believe that the selling of sex in any way is a violation and/or non-consensual abuse. Thanks for reading!
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Alex Jeon

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